capital projects

Reviving Entrepreneurial Thinking and Behavior in Capital Projects

Reviving Entrepreneurial Thinking and Behavior in Capital Projects

As capital project development has become increasingly structured and formulaic--to enable scalability and consistency--many projects have become devoid of the entrepreneurial thinking and behavior required to minimize costs and maximize returns. 

To break out of this formulaic trance and unleash the creative potential of their organizations, capital project leaders must enable their employees to consider creative alternatives in design and execution, and critically examine opportunities to improve based on their merits.

Mine Plan Radar: A Simple Tool to Visualize Your Mine Plan Alternatives

Mine Plan Radar: A Simple Tool to Visualize Your Mine Plan Alternatives

Integrated mine planning consumes tremendous amounts of organizational resources and management attention. Yet the resulting plans often fail to provide complete confidence that the ore body is being extracted optimally.

By creating a Mine Plan Radar for your operation you will have a clear, visual representation of the alternatives in front of you, allowing you to simplify a complex reality and provide confidence in your operational plans and allocation of capital.

Where Simple, Elegant Solutions Go to Die

Where Simple, Elegant Solutions Go to Die

When you help businesses to solve their operations challenges for a living, you experience all the highs and lows of organizational problem solving culture. For a sampling of the lows, check out our playful tongue-in-cheek infographic below. To learn more about finding the simple, elegant solutions hidden within your operations, join one of our Stop Guessing Workshops.

To Solve a Hard Problem, Change These Two Mindsets

To Solve a Hard Problem, Change These Two Mindsets

When we’re brought into an organization to help it solve a hard problem, we’re often introduced to the situation like this: “Oh, the solution to this one is easy: we just need to build a whole new second well — or plant — or warehouse.” Then comes the next part of that statement: “And good luck getting capital approval for that.” The translation, to us, is that the people we’re talking to already know this problem can’t be solved, and so we’re either going to have to live with it, or throw a lot of money at it.

Big-Project Engineers Have to Deal with Too Much Red Tape

Big-Project Engineers Have to Deal with Too Much Red Tape

On August 5, 2010, a mine collapsed in Chile’s Atacama Desert, trapping 33 miners more than 2,000 feet underground. Nineteen days later, as rescue crews grew desperate, a 24-year-old field engineer named Igor Proestakis decided to travel to the site with what he hoped was a breakthrough idea: using a particular drilling technology, called cluster hammers, to cut through the collapsed rock.

Commodity Projects During the Downturn: Time for Value Engineering

Commodity Projects During the Downturn: Time for Value Engineering

Those who have been following know that 2015 has not been a good year for commodity markets. As of August, nearly all hard and soft commodities have dropped in value since January 1, other than a few outliers like canola and cocoa. Perhaps most significantly, oil is trading near a 6-year low, down 50% from just a year ago

Why Projects Overrunning Budget Will Rarely be Canceled

Why Projects Overrunning Budget Will Rarely be Canceled

The frequency with which capital projects substantially overrun their budgets is widely reported though you rarely hear of a project being cancelled because of a looming cost overrun. Presumably sometimes the intangible value of the completed asset just seems too high to stop, no matter what the cost (think of preparing a city to host the Olympic Games).